Is your HR division directly related to business?

optimistic

New member
Gone are the days when HR is considered as a function only to help employees and train them when needed. In old times HR was not directly responsible for business results. But nowadays there is a shift in the trend. HR professionals are becoming business partners where they have to work closely with other departments to achieve business targets. Sometimes they have to be a sales or customer care professional.

In our company we also have to visit external customers to find out if there are any issues in the service. Also we need to help retain customers from competitors. This is also a part of performance linked incentive system of HR professionals. In our country HR related courses are also going through a transformation where along with manpower handling, business tactics are also being taught.
 

rz3300

New member
Re: Is your HR division directly related to business?

Not entirely, but then again when you really think about, you can make anything really about the business if you want to. I tend to view things in layers though, and so much of the things they deal with are on the customer satisfaction layer, which to me is separate.
 

Alexandoy

Member
Re: Is your HR division directly related to business?

My work experience is more with the bank which HR department is focused on personnel affairs only. However, my work experience with a software house is very different because the HR manager is also the Admin manager who handles the management of the office. As with the results, the department is not directly related with the profitability of the business but somehow it has an involvement especially when a project is delayed and our company suffers a penalty from the client.
 

Lindsay

New member
Re: Is your HR division directly related to business?

Our HR department is mainly a support department for other departments. They handle the admin and paperwork for things like pensions or healthcare so managers don't have to. They also know all the legal issues of how long people can work etc, and provide oversight that can flag up problems like absenteeism due to bad management in a department. I think that's the same in any organisation with a full time HR department.

In a smaller one where HR duties are part-time it makes sense to have them do other tasks to save costs and keep from having people sitting around.
 

pwarbi

New member
Re: Is your HR division directly related to business?

In my experience, while I think it is beneficial for an HR team to be involved in your actual business, it's not a priority and not something I would be too concerned about if it wasn't. As long as the HR team dealt with the employees, the company policies and the disciplinary procedures that need to be put in place, anything else they get involved with I'd consider a bonus.

I wouldn't have a driver or a person who works in the warehouse to also be involved in processing the wages, so I don't expect an HR professional to be involved in the actual business side of the company either. If they want to be then that's fine, but if they don't then I wouldn't say it's something that I expect of them.
 

optimistic

New member
Re: Is your HR division directly related to business?

In my experience, while I think it is beneficial for an HR team to be involved in your actual business, it's not a priority and not something I would be too concerned about if it wasn't. As long as the HR team dealt with the employees, the company policies and the disciplinary procedures that need to be put in place, anything else they get involved with I'd consider a bonus.

I wouldn't have a driver or a person who works in the warehouse to also be involved in processing the wages, so I don't expect an HR professional to be involved in the actual business side of the company either. If they want to be then that's fine, but if they don't then I wouldn't say it's something that I expect of them.
Very true. It actually depends on the business scenario. As I work in telecom field I feel that HR is gradually losing its image as a pure employee facilitating function but more on a business perspective. I think it is a good change as this was supposed to be a grey area for HR especially when they supervise annual performance reviews. They were not aware what is actually happening in a non-HR field like technical or sales. They never know how is the life of a sales person and what are the real challenged in field. Moreover, this helps them synchronize with other departments which ultimately results in a more fruitful and effective performance review. So if we see the big picture it's going to help the business a lot.
 

tpicks

New member
Re: Is your HR division directly related to business?

The current trend in some of establishment is the position of HR has been flexible. This is more of the case when it apears that in some periods the office is not always busy. This is a way to manage staff especially if there is a shortage, make the less busy ones be active all geared towards maximum use of the man power for maximum production. Agreed, not all organisations function like this anyway.
 

Jazmine

New member
Re: Is your HR division directly related to business?

I don't see the advantage for the HR to be a super department that would actually be involved in the sales activity unless there is some kind of multi-tasking going on and the HR staff is presenting himself/herself to the client as an ordinary sales employee. I think that would disrupt the normal business flow as the Sales Manager should be responsible for the direction of the Sales Department. The intrusion of the HR department would tend to undermine that leadership more so if they communicate with clients with respect to service quality issues. In most companies I've been with, the Sales and the Finance department's billing and collection staff are the ones directly in touch with the clients. Service quality checks are conducted by the heads of these departments. Our HR department need not be at the site of action to know what goes on in sales meetings.
 
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