Delivery: Is optimization time or steps?

Jerry Martin

New member
Steps and time are linked but not the same thing. After all, to reduce the number of steps, you could do Paris - Tokyo - Los Angeles rather than Paris - NYC - Vancouver - Los Angeles. But the latest road is faster. Not especially cheaper, but faster. About the cheap, it depends.

But sometimes I wonder where the optimization should be put, especially in this kind of cases. Each step involve a check, and more problems that may happens between transfers or the goods to the next step of the chain. Basically, clients want cheap and timely delivery. Is having less steps at least answer one of these thing? And perhaps it answers more? What's your opinion?
 

Norm

New member
Re: Delivery: Is optimization time or steps?

I agree it's better to cut down on steps as much as possible because each step is just added potential for making a mistake, especially when it means more people involved which contribute to a higher probability of human error. The most important thing to look out for, however, is to not cut down too much at the expense of the quality of the system. If you rush a sale and fail to make quality checks before sending out a package to get the transaction done faster, for example, you could just end up sending a subpar item or subpar packaging which will end up making the customer return it and thus making the process twice as long and twice as difficult.
 

Corzhens

Member
Re: Delivery: Is optimization time or steps?

I can relate to this when we send items to our branches in far-flung provinces. Sometimes the courier had to use the so called RO-RO, that's the Roll On, Roll Off transportation using buses and boats altogether. That means your cargo is carried by the bus but transferred to a boat when the road ends and the route to the sea begins. In the other port, the goods are transferred to buses again and until the delivery. That was the system before the RO-RO which was very risky for the items. But now, the bus is taken to the boat, yes, the goods remain in the bus while aboard the ship so there is no transfer involved.
 
Top