Archiving data

Jerry Martin

New member
If there's one of the hardest task I find in IT system, it is not cloud system, or in house system, or files, or emails, or even database. No, really, one the hardest task I find in business' IT system, is archives. Because as company responsibility, you have the work to archive almost everything, from every email sent to all documents available in the company, and eventually all their versions.

The problem is that, when you delete a file, you shouldn't really delete it, but rather keep a copy of it in the archives system. Same for logs of connection on the website or inside the system that should be kept for years.

How do you handle it, or how your IT department handle this computer archiving? Do you find your current solution okay?
 

Norm

New member
Re: Archiving data

I work with digital files all the time and I consider myself responsible for all my output and archiving them. What I usually do is put them in organized folders and when the files aren't needed anymore I transfer them to an external hard drive. The only problem is that the files I make are usually very large so I'm accumulating a lot of external hard drives.
 

Jerry Martin

New member
Re: Archiving data

I work with digital files all the time and I consider myself responsible for all my output and archiving them. What I usually do is put them in organized folders and when the files aren't needed anymore I transfer them to an external hard drive. The only problem is that the files I make are usually very large so I'm accumulating a lot of external hard drives.
Well, hm, okay for the external hard drives, but where do you put the external hard drives? It is for your business after all, so it should be available to the company. Also, if you handle it yourself it means you can corrupt or try to voluntarily insert wrong data inside the archives, which may be a really bad event happening inside a company.

Also, do you do redundancy, and if yes, how? Finally, do you ever consider the fact of doing the redundancy across the world via cloud (even if you just store encrypted hard drives) or you rather keep it all in your business' local?
 

Corzhens

Member
Re: Archiving data

We have a server for archiving files. The central server is actually a temporary backup in case a file in the individual computer is corrupted. And there is supposed to be a regular archiving from the central archive server to the offline archive. Our sop frequency is weekly, every Friday evening but sometimes we do it twice a week. Even at home, we use the cloud for the temporary backup but we have an offline archive disk.
 

Jerry Martin

New member
Re: Archiving data

We have a server for archiving files. The central server is actually a temporary backup in case a file in the individual computer is corrupted. And there is supposed to be a regular archiving from the central archive server to the offline archive. Our sop frequency is weekly, every Friday evening but sometimes we do it twice a week. Even at home, we use the cloud for the temporary backup but we have an offline archive disk.
It seems I wasn't wrong about that: archiving data is important for companies and doesn't tolerate at all any kind of data loss, and tries to save as much data as possible.
When you talk about offline archive, I guess it is still on a hard disk and not in paper or something? Or I'm wrong and they compile it before online archives? Because archives on paper doesn't tend to get "corrupted", meanwhile an hard disk may fail at anytime since it's magnetic data and magnetic data can goes away after few years. That's why I ask. But if you do often the offline copies, you must see it quickly.
 

Corzhens

Member
Re: Archiving data

Data loss is a no-no for IT practitioners. We belong to the IT department that's why the supply chain under my command is all about old and new computers that includes devices, nothing more. And the standard in our procedures as regards backing up data is the off-site archive. So that means the data in my computer is backed up to the server temporarily and archived to a portable. But once a month, that portable is archived to another portable that is brought to another location. That purpose is when a fire breaks out and burns everything, we have an archive in another location. Off-site measure.
 

Jerry Martin

New member
Re: Archiving data

Data loss is a no-no for IT practitioners. We belong to the IT department that's why the supply chain under my command is all about old and new computers that includes devices, nothing more. And the standard in our procedures as regards backing up data is the off-site archive. So that means the data in my computer is backed up to the server temporarily and archived to a portable. But once a month, that portable is archived to another portable that is brought to another location. That purpose is when a fire breaks out and burns everything, we have an archive in another location. Off-site measure.
To a portable? I would have thought storage would rather operate on external hard disks than any kind of portable and transfer in-network, but then. Why preferring this approach of portables rather than storing on back up hard disk straight away? I guess you don't decide but perhaps you know how they justify that or how you find this beneficial rather than hard disks?

It's at least nice to see they don't consider loss as an option. It is known that some companies doesn't archive some old data. I think for example, TV companies doesn't every time keep a record of their broadcast somewhere.
 

Oldwriter

New member
Re: Archiving data

You can complement your local backup plan with the service long-term archiving from Amazon Glacier:

https://aws.amazon.com/glacier/

To keep costs low, Amazon Glacier is optimized for infrequently accessed data where a retrieval time of several hours is suitable.
This means it is not really a substitute for a centralized in-house file server which has the ability to retrieve old files instantly as needed, but rather, it it hired to know that all company files are secure and fully-backed in case of disaster.

Amazon Glacier shines as a "backup of the backup", so to speak. Currently the cost is only $ 0.07 per gigabyte, cheap enough for any company that values their data to afford without complaints.
 

Norm

New member
Re: Archiving data

In my previous employment which was an IT firm we had our own servers so I guess the guys in charge did know where to backup all the files and our boss was very meticulous and kept track of everything so I'm sure that all details were always stores somewhere. All our communications were asked including emails and all our computers were very controlled in that only a few choice programs were allowed to work.
 

TheFunneler

New member
Re: Archiving data

Automatic backups are where it's at. I can only imagine the millions of dollars that have been saved because of how useful automatic backups are, there's no way to overstress it. It's so easy to lose a significant file that there's no excuse with our level of tech.
 

xTinx

New member
Re: Archiving data

Companies usually keep a separate system for archives and they're mostly offline and in-house. Meaning, you can't just access this system from outside and it doesn't need internet connection. All you need to have is a software specifically installed by the resident IT guy. My mother used to work for a newspaper publishing company and she stores all the paper's articles under different categories (even those that date back to the 80s, the year when the company was established) in a system called Alice - biologists use the same system in their labs. Whenever editors need a reference article, with the help of keywords and categories, she's able to retrieve the correct files without hassle.
 

Norm

New member
Re: Archiving data

Companies usually keep a separate system for archives and they're mostly offline and in-house. Meaning, you can't just access this system from outside and it doesn't need internet connection. All you need to have is a software specifically installed by the resident IT guy. My mother used to work for a newspaper publishing company and she stores all the paper's articles under different categories (even those that date back to the 80s, the year when the company was established) in a system called Alice - biologists use the same system in their labs. Whenever editors need a reference article, with the help of keywords and categories, she's able to retrieve the correct files without hassle.
We had a similar system back in the day when I used to work at an IT firm. Whenever I needed resources for my designs I'd just log into our servers and look for the folders where I can get our licensed stock pictures and fonts. It's very convenient especially at that time when resources online weren't as abundant as it is now.
 
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