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Spoiled food stuff in the warehouse

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  • Spoiled food stuff in the warehouse

    Just recently, I have read a news item about the social welfare warehouse in the province found to have a huge stock of expired food items. Those stock were intended for calamities to be distributed to the needy people when hit by a typhoon. The news report said that the problem lies in the inventory that the warehouse custodian or supply chain manager failed to check on the validity period of their stocks. It is such a big waste to think that sacks of rice and even canned food items were expired because of the negligence. It is a black eye to the warehousing industry.

  • #2
    Re: Spoiled food stuff in the warehouse

    You would have thought that if the food was being stockpiled for something that was so serious, then you would have thought that storage and stock rotation would have been one of the most important factors they would have considered. It is stories like this that give warehousing companies a bad name, but having said that there are a lot more good ones than bad ones, but just like anything else in the world you don't get to hear about the good ones as that doesn't make good news headlines.

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    • #3
      Re: Spoiled food stuff in the warehouse

      Originally posted by hades_leae
      It is indeed, rice and beans, or canned foods don't spoil. It's a shame that these businesses don't keep up with produce like they should. Hefty amounts of produce that goes to waste because of poor management just shows how incapable and incompetent that team is. Stock rotation is key in any stock pile, anyone should know that.
      One other worrying aspect is that because the food stocks was intended for those who are in a tragic situation, I just hope that the warehouse staff didn't take advantage of that fact and purposely neglected their responsibilities because they thought it wasn't as important as storing stock and items for the paying customers.

      In the past when goods have been donated for a cause, a few times it's actually come out that they haven't been stored correctly and so in the end a lot of the produce that as been collected as gone to waste and so now charities like the Red Cross, especially here in England have taken upon themselves to make sure the donated items are looked after as they know that outsourcing that aspect of the charity hasn't worked.

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      • #4
        Re: Spoiled food stuff in the warehouse

        That's sad to hear. I think in jobs like this one where the nature is more in line with charity it's better to get people who really care for the goals of the operation rather than just the paycheck so mistakes like this would be minimized but who knows maybe it was just an honest mistake and they do tend to happen from time to time even for systems like this that are presumably a little less complex than an actual business. I think they should take this as an opportunity to learn and see where they could make changes to make give their system better structure.

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        • #5
          Re: Spoiled food stuff in the warehouse

          This immediately reminded of a job that I had a long time ago, before college, where it was a grounds company and there was a big warehouse there, and there was one older guy who would always eat hard boiled eggs for breakfast about once a week, and on that the place just reeked. He knew it full well too, but was the type of person who had been on the job so long that he stopped caring years ago. I guess it is better than some other smells that could ne there, but it was pretty rough on the hot days.

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          • #6
            Re: Spoiled food stuff in the warehouse

            What a wasteful mess. When stocks of food spoil, it means that something failed in the logistics procedure. And this kind of neglect happens more often under government management than in private hands of ONGs or businesses. So far, is not the first time I heard of spoiled food left in a warehouse by negligence, It happens too in the third world in latinamerica. I remember there was a great scandal all over SouthAmerica because in Venezuela a group of people discovered thousands of tons of stock of food left to rot in nowhere, and the government was easily identified as the culprit since the packages had the logo of "Mercal", a supply chain financed by the state to distribute regulated and imported food.

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            • #7
              Re: Spoiled food stuff in the warehouse

              That is a serious case of negligence on the part of public officials. It's as if they forgot there were even donations in the first place. I joined a relief operation once, packing goods for victims of typhoon Yolanda. We were asked by the officials to just dump the goods inside a designated stock room at one of the military bases in our locality. The goods were never delivered to the victims. I do not even know what they did with them. It's not only negligence but a whole new level of corruption. Those people must be taken to task and held accountable for their actions.

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              • #8
                Re: Spoiled food stuff in the warehouse

                Originally posted by pwarbi View Post
                One other worrying aspect is that because the food stocks was intended for those who are in a tragic situation, I just hope that the warehouse staff didn't take advantage of that fact and purposely neglected their responsibilities because they thought it wasn't as important as storing stock and items for the paying customers.

                In the past when goods have been donated for a cause, a few times it's actually come out that they haven't been stored correctly and so in the end a lot of the produce that as been collected as gone to waste and so now charities like the Red Cross, especially here in England have taken upon themselves to make sure the donated items are looked after as they know that outsourcing that aspect of the charity hasn't worked.
                It's sad to think about, but you're probably onto something there. I feel like a lot of people in "emergency management" situations tend to neglect some duties like that since they know it's going to "less fortunate" people anyway, and they think survivors of a flood or hurricane will be happy to just get anything they're offered. Of course, I'm an American, and maybe I'm still bitter about the way we handled Hurricane Katrina.

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                • #9
                  Re: Spoiled food stuff in the warehouse

                  Originally posted by xTinx View Post
                  That is a serious case of negligence on the part of public officials. It's as if they forgot there were even donations in the first place. I joined a relief operation once, packing goods for victims of typhoon Yolanda. We were asked by the officials to just dump the goods inside a designated stock room at one of the military bases in our locality. The goods were never delivered to the victims. I do not even know what they did with them. It's not only negligence but a whole new level of corruption. Those people must be taken to task and held accountable for their actions.
                  You are right. It is a serious case of negligence that should be investigated thoroughly and those responsible should face the music. With that amount of food wasted just like that, there is no reason for those government agency officials to be staying in their position. That's one problem in the bureaucracy here, the neglect that is prevailing in most officials because their reason is that everyone is doing the same - not minding their business. Worse, the problem of negligence is only discovered when a new administration comes in with a new set of officials for the agencies where they discover the sins of the past administration.

                  In warehousing, expiry dates of the stocks is well taken into consideration all the time hence there is the concept of FIFO - first in, first out method.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Spoiled food stuff in the warehouse

                    I wonder if the manager of the facility should solely be blamed for this debacle. I have seen instances of this type situation before. This could have resulted from a flaw in the design of the program in which there was a consideration for the stockpiling of the supplies and no plan of action for relieving the storage of goods that would eventually be spoilt. There have been many events of inappropriate planning when it comes to relief supplies and in some instances, the supplies hardly ever reach the intended needy persons. Maybe it's time some international organization, probably having the importance similar to the United Nations, or even the United Nations, develop a code of conduct for the handling of relief supplies.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Spoiled food stuff in the warehouse

                      Originally posted by Corzhens View Post
                      You are right. It is a serious case of negligence that should be investigated thoroughly and those responsible should face the music. With that amount of food wasted just like that, there is no reason for those government agency officials to be staying in their position. That's one problem in the bureaucracy here, the neglect that is prevailing in most officials because their reason is that everyone is doing the same - not minding their business. Worse, the problem of negligence is only discovered when a new administration comes in with a new set of officials for the agencies where they discover the sins of the past administration.

                      In warehousing, expiry dates of the stocks is well taken into consideration all the time hence there is the concept of FIFO - first in, first out method.
                      FIFO is a good practice for most things, but for food storage it's essential. I almost wonder if this sort of thing can be prevented by having a stricter disposal/wholesaler method. A lot of food companies liquidate items well before the sell by date to discount wholesalers just to avoid this exact problem, and it might be a better practice for other companies to start engaging.

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                      • #12
                        Re: Spoiled food stuff in the warehouse

                        That is miserable to listen. I think in employments like this one where the nature is more in accordance with philanthropy it's ideal to get individuals who truly administer to the objectives of the operation as opposed to only the paycheck so botches like this would be limited yet who knows possibly it was only an innocent slip-up and they do have a tendency to occur every once in a while notwithstanding for frameworks like this that are apparently somewhat less mind boggling than a genuine business. I think they should accept this as an open door to learn and see where they could roll out improvements to improve give their framework structure.
                        Synchronzed Supply Systems Ltd

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                        • #13
                          Re: Spoiled food stuff in the warehouse

                          I think these warehouse people should make use of FIFO model i.e. first in first out model. This will help them to reduce the loss of food due to expiry date.

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                          • #14
                            Re: Spoiled food stuff in the warehouse

                            Stock rotation is key in any stock pile, anyone should know that.

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                            • #15
                              Ordinarily, In my country some business establishment or company's have seen their products which have expired or very close to its expiry date flood the market with great force and are all sold at a very cheap price compared to the initial cost of sale of such products in the open market. Now, it could be pinned at some wholesalers who duck and hoard the these products in their warehouse with the view of causing artificial scarcity in order to sell at increased prices but when they fail to work in line with the product expiring date, that's when such cases of selling expired products begin to surface.

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