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How Project management can contribut to supply chain and logistic ???

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  • How Project management can contribut to supply chain and logistic ???

    Hi guys ,

    I had a conversation with a close friend of mine lately , in which he advised me against going to work in Logistic and Supply chain field at a supervisor level kind of position , since I have no prior experience working in such field but I did worked in projects that support operations department directly will this experience of mine count ?

    As far as I know that project management skill is very valuable and it can be put in use in any field and logistic and supply chain is no exception .

    In KSA , to be given a project manager position you should have the technical knowledge and experience . I can work as a support to those projects manger but I never should expect to be giving a role of project manger with just a project management knowledge and experience with little technical industry background , I will always be a project leader or coordinator .

    I got an interest in supply chain a year ago from an interview I had with a company in the past that got me into the liking of this field and how it is important and has the greatest impact to the company business ( specially in KSA ) the supply chain simply can make or break a company .

    The function itself helps you see the importance of how do you move from raw material to finished goods and sending them over to end customers.

    From that point onward , I started educating my self on supply chain and logistics subject to be able to at least show that I have the knowledge and how project management principle can be integrated into the supply chain.

    Will this approach help me to get into this field ? How can a PMP certified project leader with more than 4 years experience in Project Management can be of value In such a field ? What positions I could be working in those two field ?

    Thank you for taking your time reading my question and can't wait to hear your answers/comments on the subject .

    Have a good day ...

    Ali

  • #2
    Re: How Project management can contribut to supply chain and logistic ???

    we are also provide transport management ERP , for manage supply chain transportation , called as "Logi-ERP". we all know that erp is must for manage that kind of all system.all transportation system is manage by logi erp.it is a complete erp solution for manage all transportation details.

    more details :-
    www.kenovaweb.com

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: How Project management can contribut to supply chain and logistic ???

      Hi Ali

      I'm not sure that you've had a direct answer to your question yet, so I'll give it a go - please be aware that this is only my view and I would expect situations to change from company to company and country to country.

      Having experience in Project Management will not do you any harm at all and if you have looked into supply chain and can talk about how project management fits within it then you can start to give the interviewer some confidence that you have a genuine interest in the field. I would have examples (real life examples) ready so that you can talk about:
      • How the skills you have learnt within project management can be transferred to the area of supply chain that you are aiming to join.
      • How would your experience of project management add to the company over the experience held by someone who has spent time in a direct supply chain role - why chose you rather than an experienced supply chain professional?
      • While working in project management you have a very narrow scope (you have a single project to deliver), while working in supply chain is much, much broader - can you prove that you could handle the additional exposure and still meet your targets.
      • My personal concern would be your experience of man-management. In a project team you have a goal which you are all working towards, and the fact that you are part of a dedicated team suggests that you al

      l share a desire to deliver a result. This may not be the situation within a supply chain role. Speaking as someone from a warehouse / distribution environment I know that a percentage of the people working for me are there because they couldn't find a better job, they have no interest beyond earning a wage having given minimum effort (harsh maybe, but I'd defy anyone to prove me wrong). Can you demonstrate how you would achieve your targets with a team that isn't as single minded as the teams you have worked in previously?

      Your project experience won't work against you, but you will need to stress the advantages that your experience will bring with real life examples and you will need to overcome the interviewers possible bias that you know all the theory but none of the practical side - do this and you will have levelled the field.

      Good luck

      PC
      Increase your warehouse efficiency. Worldwide application: www.sanvean.co.uk

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: How Project management can contribut to supply chain and logistic ???

        Sorry, just realised that I messed up the formatting (and I can't work out how to edit the post to put it right), hope it still makes sense.
        Increase your warehouse efficiency. Worldwide application: www.sanvean.co.uk

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: How Project management can contribut to supply chain and logistic ???

          Dear primary colours ,,,, Your post did indeed helped me thinking about it from different angle .. Thank you ..

          Perhaps , If you dont mind ... I would like to hear more from you on the subject ...

          For starters , beside my skills and experience in project management :

          -What are the most top 3 skills that supply chain manager look in a candidate for a supporting or assistance manager role
          ( Supervising Level ) ?

          -Do you think , talking about my procurement management ( While performing project management activity ) experience could be a selling point to a supply chain managers ?? ..

          Since procurement is a key part in the supply chain ? What are the most 3 skills I have to focus on related to supply chain procurement from your experience ?

          -Last , What resources that helped you prepare for a management position in supply chain manager job? and What’s the biggest mistake you see newbies make in this profession?


          Note :

          -I am enrolled with the SupplyChainSecrte Online Education Written Course by Rob O'Byrne , Which sound very good so far ....

          -Regarding People management, I did very well so far I was responsible for managing project work of 20 people including subcontractors.

          -In addition , I used to manage multiple projects at a time , including operations supporting activities.
          I am familiar with things like resources and capacity management these were an important activities in my job .



          Thank you again for taking the time to share your experience and perspective with us ....

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: How Project management can contribut to supply chain and logistic ???

            Hi Ali

            That's some pretty big questions there - I'll do my best to give my viewpoint, but please remember that my experience is in warehouse and distribution management, so will not apply to all branches of the supply chain - likewise it is very much MY experience and shouldn't be taken as gospel:

            "What are the most top 3 skills that supply chain manager look in a candidate for a supporting or assistance manager role( Supervising Level ) ?" The problem here is that recruitment very rarely takes place in a vacuum - by this I mean that there will be several considerations to make when recruiting a new member of the management team and these considerations will change with time. What makes the ideal candidate today may be completely different to the ideal candidate in 3 months time (things like salary expectations, the existing management teams strengths and weaknesses and time available to develop the individual will all play a part in making the final decision) - these considerations are largely out of your hands as a candidate so you can do little to prepare or sell yourself against them. In attempting to answer your question however, I normally look for:

            A candidate who will add to the strengths of the current management team: What skills can the candidate add and are these needed in the current structure? As an example - in a previous role I took over a team that was used to adopting a very 'hard' and abrasive management style. I wanted to soften this, to encourage empowerment and have staff take the responsibility for making day to day decisions rather than turning to their supervisor / manager every time out of fear. I changed our emphasis on leadership style and introduced data analysis, negotiation and interpersonal skills as requirements. But this was always going to be a short-term change, as we'd always need a number of "managers who shout" within the team to provide balance.

            Innovation: Companies are always looking to save cost and maximise service - a manager who can identify the need to change and can drive that change will always be in demand. I look for examples of when a candidate has managed a change programme and delivered results rather than someone who has continued to successfully manage an established process.

            Man-management skills: candidates need to demonstrate that they can manage successfully under a variety of conditions and with a mix of motivated / under-motivated staff. They will also need to demonstrate that they can prove (as much as is possible) that it was their management that made a difference - this introduces a discussion on the ability to identify the appropriate data to use (there's an interesting thread on warehouse KPI's on this forum which scratches the surface of this - link: http://www.supplychainforum.com/show...e-productivity).

            "Do you think , talking about my procurement management ( While performing project management activity ) experience could be a selling point to a supply chain managers ?? .." In terms of warehousing / distribution - no. The 2 subjects are too far apart to be relevant. The project management side could be useful if you can relate it directly to the role on offer, but procurement alone would offer no benefits in my experience.

            "Since procurement is a key part in the supply chain ? What are the most 3 skills I have to focus on related to supply chain procurement from your experience ?" I have no experience of procurement so can't answer this with any authority. From my little exposure to procurement I would suggest data analysis and negotiation skills as 2 primary requirements, but would struggle to identify a third and would doff my cap to an answer provided by someone with direct procurement experience.

            "What resources that helped you prepare for a management position in supply chain manager job? and What’s the biggest mistake you see newbies make in this profession?" That's a great question. In terms of resources I'd have to say "Experience" and "Exposure" - I worked for a number of companies before getting a chance to work in management, I saw a number of different methods and styles and was able to pick and choose those which I believed worked. Sometimes I was right, sometimes I was wrong. I also took the time to talk about why a particular decision was made with my manager, to try to understand the logic behind it and why this particular path was seen as the most appropriate. Please remember I am very likely in a completely different generation to you, we didn't have the internet and immediate access to the sum of human knowledge, so our ability to draw on information was much more limited than people have today and I'm sure that there are much better resources out there now.

            In terms of the biggest mistakes I'd have to say Overconfidence, Inability to Adapt and Defensiveness. Younger candidates are much more likely to show examples of overconfidence (or perhaps a massive desire to appear 'in charge') and defensiveness - neither is a good way to learn. Always be prepared to listen to another point of view and to consider it, even if it goes completely against your views, if you honestly believe that you have all the correct answers, you are wrong. If something goes wrong, be prepared to admit it and to learn from it - defending the indefensible is a sure sign that you are not prepared to listen, adapt or change and will not inspire confidence in those around you. Inability to Adapt can affect us all at times but I have seen it a lot in staff who have joined as graduates or who have a background in 'associated roles' (I would class Project Management amongst this) - referring back to my previous post I see this as your biggest hurdle - you may know a lot of the theory behind running a successful operation, but can you turn this into a practical recovery plan when things start to go pear-shaped, or don't pan out as you would expect?

            Good to see that you have already invested time and effort into some of the skills that will be needed, this will be a huge positive for you when you reach interview stage, so be prepared to talk about what you have done, the potential benefits it can offer and how you would propose to turn your theory into practice.

            Long post - apologies for that and I'd welcome anyone else who chips in with a different perspective.

            PC
            Increase your warehouse efficiency. Worldwide application: www.sanvean.co.uk

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: How Project management can contribut to supply chain and logistic ???

              Any company running a supply chain can be very successful using these important pointers.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: How Project management can contribut to supply chain and logistic ???

                Project management is the application of knowledge, skills, tools, and techniques to project activities to meet the project requirements. Some of the factors on which the project management emphasizes are:

                Scheduling and Planning
                Risk Management
                Business case and financial awareness
                Quality Systems
                Roles and Responsibilities
                Communication

                project management offers the procurement executive the foundations upon which he or she can build a good, strategic procurement plan. Without the foundations of project management there may be a strategy but no basis upon which to deliver in with the results ad hoc, sporadic and poorly delivered.
                Synchronzed Supply Systems Ltd

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: How Project management can contribut to supply chain and logistic ???

                  Project management can bring many benefits to a logistics business. Good project management should reduce the chance of a project failing, ensure a minimum level of quality and that results meet requirements and expectations. Also encourage consistent communications amongst staff & suppliers and keep costs, time frames and resources to budget.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: How Project management can contribut to supply chain and logistic ???

                    Originally posted by primary colours View Post
                    Hi Ali

                    That's some pretty big questions there - I'll do my best to give my viewpoint, but please remember that my experience is in warehouse and distribution management, so will not apply to all branches of the supply chain - likewise it is very much MY experience and shouldn't be taken as gospel:

                    "What are the most top 3 skills that supply chain manager look in a candidate for a supporting or assistance manager role( Supervising Level ) ?" The problem here is that recruitment very rarely takes place in a vacuum - by this I mean that there will be several considerations to make when recruiting a new member of the management team and these considerations will change with time. What makes the ideal candidate today may be completely different to the ideal candidate in 3 months time (things like salary expectations, the existing management teams strengths and weaknesses and time available to develop the individual will all play a part in making the final decision) - these considerations are largely out of your hands as a candidate so you can do little to prepare or sell yourself against them. In attempting to answer your question however, I normally look for:

                    A candidate who will add to the strengths of the current management team: What skills can the candidate add and are these needed in the current structure? As an example - in a previous role I took over a team that was used to adopting a very 'hard' and abrasive management style. I wanted to soften this, to encourage empowerment and have staff take the responsibility for making day to day decisions rather than turning to their supervisor / manager every time out of fear. I changed our emphasis on leadership style and introduced data analysis, negotiation and interpersonal skills as requirements. But this was always going to be a short-term change, as we'd always need a number of "managers who shout" within the team to provide balance.

                    Innovation: Companies are always looking to save cost and maximise service - a manager who can identify the need to change and can drive that change will always be in demand. I look for examples of when a candidate has managed a change programme and delivered results rather than someone who has continued to successfully manage an established process.

                    Man-management skills: candidates need to demonstrate that they can manage successfully under a variety of conditions and with a mix of motivated / under-motivated staff. They will also need to demonstrate that they can prove (as much as is possible) that it was their management that made a difference - this introduces a discussion on the ability to identify the appropriate data to use (there's an interesting thread on warehouse KPI's on this forum which scratches the surface of this - link: http://www.supplychainforum.com/show...e-productivity).

                    "Do you think , talking about my procurement management ( While performing project management activity ) experience could be a selling point to a supply chain managers ?? .." In terms of warehousing / distribution - no. The 2 subjects are too far apart to be relevant. The project management side could be useful if you can relate it directly to the role on offer, but procurement alone would offer no benefits in my experience.

                    "Since procurement is a key part in the supply chain ? What are the most 3 skills I have to focus on related to supply chain procurement from your experience ?" I have no experience of procurement so can't answer this with any authority. From my little exposure to procurement I would suggest data analysis and negotiation skills as 2 primary requirements, but would struggle to identify a third and would doff my cap to an answer provided by someone with direct procurement experience.

                    "What resources that helped you prepare for a management position in supply chain manager job? and What’s the biggest mistake you see newbies make in this profession?" That's a great question. In terms of resources I'd have to say "Experience" and "Exposure" - I worked for a number of companies before getting a chance to work in management, I saw a number of different methods and styles and was able to pick and choose those which I believed worked. Sometimes I was right, sometimes I was wrong. I also took the time to talk about why a particular decision was made with my manager, to try to understand the logic behind it and why this particular path was seen as the most appropriate. Please remember I am very likely in a completely different generation to you, we didn't have the internet and immediate access to the sum of human knowledge, so our ability to draw on information was much more limited than people have today and I'm sure that there are much better resources out there now.

                    In terms of the biggest mistakes I'd have to say Overconfidence, Inability to Adapt and Defensiveness. Younger candidates are much more likely to show examples of overconfidence (or perhaps a massive desire to appear 'in charge') and defensiveness - neither is a good way to learn. Always be prepared to listen to another point of view and to consider it, even if it goes completely against your views, if you honestly believe that you have all the correct answers, you are wrong. If something goes wrong, be prepared to admit it and to learn from it - defending the indefensible is a sure sign that you are not prepared to listen, adapt or change and will not inspire confidence in those around you. Inability to Adapt can affect us all at times but I have seen it a lot in staff who have joined as graduates or who have a background in 'associated roles' (I would class Project Management amongst this) - referring back to my previous post I see this as your biggest hurdle - you may know a lot of the theory behind running a successful operation, but can you turn this into a practical recovery plan when things start to go pear-shaped, or don't pan out as you would expect?

                    Good to see that you have already invested time and effort into some of the skills that will be needed, this will be a huge positive for you when you reach interview stage, so be prepared to talk about what you have done, the potential benefits it can offer and how you would propose to turn your theory into practice.

                    Long post - apologies for that and I'd welcome anyone else who chips in with a different perspective.

                    PC
                    No , it was not long it was perfect and just so you know , your reply and others helped a lot during my interview last week . I was able to answer interview questions with confidence your reply gave me an insight about how project management can related to area such as procurement and supply chain .

                    Sorry for not able to reply sooner , I was busy preparing for the interview ... I am really grateful to you and others for replying to my post and I welcome more thoughts and more insight from all of you ...

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: How Project management can contribut to supply chain and logistic ???

                      Originally posted by pramod View Post
                      Project management is the application of knowledge, skills, tools, and techniques to project activities to meet the project requirements. Some of the factors on which the project management emphasizes are:

                      Scheduling and Planning
                      Risk Management
                      Business case and financial awareness
                      Quality Systems
                      Roles and Responsibilities
                      Communication

                      project management offers the procurement executive the foundations upon which he or she can build a good, strategic procurement plan. Without the foundations of project management there may be a strategy but no basis upon which to deliver in with the results ad hoc, sporadic and poorly delivered.
                      Yeah , you are right that's how project management is important to area such as procurement .

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: How Project management can contribut to supply chain and logistic ???

                        Running projects without good project management is a false economy. It’s often thought to be an unnecessary burden on the budget, and there’s no doubt it can be expensive – as much as 20% of the overall project budget. But can you afford to not have project management? Without it, what holds the team and client together? And without it, who is left to navigate through the ups and downs, clashes and catastrophes of projects?

                        Great project management means much more than keeping project management’s iron triangle in check, delivering on time, budget, and scope; it unites clients and teams, creates a vision for success and gets everyone on the same page of what’s needed to stay on track for success. When projects are managed properly, there’s a positive impact that reverberates beyond delivery of ‘the stuff’.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: How Project management can contribut to supply chain and logistic ???

                          Project management in supply chain and logistics emphasises the integration of manufacturing and service operations, logistics, purchasing, and distribution. From this we learn how to manage projects for organisational success, develop an understanding of critical components in organisational supply chains, and apply business analytic methods for organising and fully integrating supply chain practices.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: How Project management can contribut to supply chain and logistic ???

                            Cool. It is important.

                            Comment

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