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Dealing With Frequent Absences

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  • #16
    Re: Dealing With Frequent Absences

    From the perspective of an employee, they may have never learned to have a serious work ethic and they may truly have issues, perhaps medical, emotional, or family related. No doubt they have their reasons for being late or absent. But from the perspective of the employer, they need their employee to be there, regularly and on time. I'm sure this situation causes lots of employees to lose their jobs. And they may have to go through several jobs before they learn to make regular and timely attendance a serious priority in their work life. And again, they may never learn!

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    • #17
      Re: Dealing With Frequent Absences

      Originally posted by cluckeyo View Post
      From the perspective of an employee, they may have never learned to have a serious work ethic and they may truly have issues, perhaps medical, emotional, or family related. No doubt they have their reasons for being late or absent. But from the perspective of the employer, they need their employee to be there, regularly and on time. I'm sure this situation causes lots of employees to lose their jobs. And they may have to go through several jobs before they learn to make regular and timely attendance a serious priority in their work life. And again, they may never learn!
      Of course they would always have a reason for their tardiness or absences. I have this guinea pig of sorts, a co-employee who lives near our village. I have interviewed him why he comes in late most of the time and his reason is the traffic. He is one in the ranks and he knows that I am in the managerial level. When I told him that I leave home by 5am, he was greatly surprised because we have the same official start of work at 8am. When he asked why I leave so early, I retorted - so that I would not have a reason when I come in late for work. He was speechless because my reply was full of sarcasm. Nevertheless, he still had his habit of coming in late with the traffic as his usual reason.

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      • #18
        Re: Dealing With Frequent Absences

        Originally posted by pwarbi View Post

        i myself am in the office everyday of the week at some point to catch upon work and to get things done, but I wouldn't expect my employees to do the same. This is my business and so I'm going to be more dedicated to it as I know that the more work I get done, the better financially off I will be. For my employees who are getting a salary for doing their specific jobs, I wouldn't expect them to be as passionate as I am, and if they are entitled to an holiday then the last thing I am going to do is punish them for taking it, or make them feel guilty in anyway.
        This is exactly how my husband thinks when it comes to being an employer. We cannot expect our employees to have the same amount of passion like we have when it comes to our business. An owner will always have the most passion in his work because his/her business is a very precious thing for him/her. After all, a business will not succeed if the owner him/herself doesn't have the dedication and perseverance to run it.

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        • #19
          Re: Dealing With Frequent Absences

          Looks like me and your husband @gracer have the same sort of mentality when it comes to business then, and I'm sure I speak for him as well when I say I'm glad we're not the only ones that think this way. For an employee, the main reason that they work for you is for the salary, and while they might appreciate the respect that you give them as well, what they don't want you to do as an employer is put them under so much pressure that they feel that they have to do more than hat they are paid for, and make them think that without them that company would fail.

          That pressure should be on you as the owners shoulders and nobody else's.

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          • #20
            Re: Dealing With Frequent Absences

            Originally posted by pwarbi View Post
            Looks like me and your husband @gracer have the same sort of mentality when it comes to business then, and I'm sure I speak for him as well when I say I'm glad we're not the only ones that think this way. For an employee, the main reason that they work for you is for the salary, and while they might appreciate the respect that you give them as well, what they don't want you to do as an employer is put them under so much pressure that they feel that they have to do more than hat they are paid for, and make them think that without them that company would fail.

            That pressure should be on you as the owners shoulders and nobody else's.
            I think you both have the same mentality pwarbi. When I saw your previous post, it felt like I was actually reading it from my husband himself. Lol! But seriously speaking, I must admit that I didn't understand his mentality at first because I was more of a stiff and stricter person than him. At first I also had the mentality that our employees should work as hard as we did because they were being paid to do so. But learning my husband's way taught me how to be more understandable of the needs of our employees. It did help in a great way because I no longer get stressed in expecting more from our employees but instead I expect more on our part as owners because we all will benefit in the end.

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            • #21
              Re: Dealing With Frequent Absences

              As a manager, I think this depends on the situation. If you have someone who is late all the time, with no real reason other than "I couldnt find a ride", its probably in yours (and the companies) best interest to let that person go... Now, If you have someone who is absent here and there with legit reasons (passing of CLOSE family member, sick/hospitalized child, disaster happened, etc) then I would give that person a chance. We have all been down on our luck before, and most likely, that person is absolutely trying and cannot afford to lose this income. That being said, I would ONLY do this, instead of fire and rehire someone else, IF I knew I had enough employees to cover these absent shifts. I tend to have employees who love the overtime.

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              • #22
                Re: Dealing With Frequent Absences

                As an employee, I feel it would be rude to be absent more than 3 times in a month without leave credits. With leave credits, a maximum of 5 days would be enough (including sick leave - unless it's an operation that requires more than 5 days of recovery). If I'm the employer, maximum of 5 days of leave in a month (unless it concerns grave health circumstances) would be justifiable. Maximum of 3 for absences without pay.

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                • #23
                  Re: Dealing With Frequent Absences

                  As I've said before, I think I'm a lot more lenient than most other bosses, but that tends to mean that not only do I have a better working relationship with my employees, I have a relationship with them on a more personal level as well. If an employee needs time off for anything then I will bend over backwards to try and incorporate this, and because of that I don't really have an issue with absenteeism. I found that places here I have worked in the past have been strict, and in some circumstances people have even been refused time off to attend a parents funeral and so if your're going to treat your employees with that amount of disrespect, I'm not surprised that they ould rather not turn in for work than instead come and ask for the time off like they should do.

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                  • #24
                    Re: Dealing With Frequent Absences

                    It could be far too simplistic to think the solution is "just fire the lazy pants" and hire another one. If management notices frequent absences from an employee, the best thing to deal with this problem is to have a conversation in regards of this issue and look for the real reason why is skipping so much
                    days during a month. If the employee just tries to get away of it with a lame excuse, is better to warn him/her can lose the job if persists with skipping too much working days. Otherwise, reasons may vary, maybe is because public traffic is been failing lately or there was a local natural disaster or the employee
                    is dealing with a depression due to a relative sickness or death.

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                    • #25
                      Re: Dealing With Frequent Absences

                      Employers should take a look at the effect frequent absences are having on the business. If there is a negative impact, the offending employee should be given a warning which if it goes unheeded would end with the hiring of someone else who won't be causing inconveniences by being absent from work say each week or even several times a week.

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                      • #26
                        Re: Dealing With Frequent Absences

                        Originally posted by pwarbi View Post
                        I found that places here I have worked in the past have been strict, and in some circumstances people have even been refused time off to attend a parents funeral and so if your're going to treat your employees with that amount of disrespect, I'm not surprised that they ould rather not turn in for work than instead come and ask for the time off like they should do.
                        It's hard for me to imagine this because I don't think I would also continue working for a company which doesn't even allow these kinds of sudden but important absences in an employee's life. Our employees were always given the time to grieve and attend to the necessary things involved in their loved ones' death. Situations like these also need to be taken into consideration by an employer because they are part of being human.

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                        • #27
                          Re: Dealing With Frequent Absences

                          Originally posted by Vampa View Post
                          Employers should take a look at the effect frequent absences are having on the business. If there is a negative impact, the offending employee should be given a warning which if it goes unheeded would end with the hiring of someone else who won't be causing inconveniences by being absent from work say each week or even several times a week.
                          When my husband was working in a British company, he was frequently absent due to his ailment in the stomach. He had gastritis that sometimes gives him difficulty in breathing (heartburn maybe). And when the pain in his stomach is unbearable, he would take a day off. After several absences of that nature, their manager talked to him. The manager explained to my husband that he was hired because there is work to do. So if he is always absent then how could the work be done. The manager made my husband realize that fact which made my husband change his ways. He had the resolve not to be absent even if he was not feeling well. As long as he could go to work then he went to work. Maybe he was scared of the thought that the company might find a replacement for him.

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                          • #28
                            Re: Dealing With Frequent Absences

                            Originally posted by gracer View Post
                            It's hard for me to imagine this because I don't think I would also continue working for a company which doesn't even allow these kinds of sudden but important absences in an employee's life. Our employees were always given the time to grieve and attend to the necessary things involved in their loved ones' death. Situations like these also need to be taken into consideration by an employer because they are part of being human.
                            I agree but sadly there are a lot of companies out there that put profits ahead of their employees, and I worked at a number of places that made people work longer or extra just to make up the time they have missed due to an emergency or important appointment. In this day and age I don't understand why some bosses don't understand that if they treat their employees with respect and understanding, then in return they will then get that back, and if the company is ever in trouble, they will go above and beyond because they have done the same for them in the past.

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                            • #29
                              Re: Dealing With Frequent Absences

                              Originally posted by pwarbi View Post
                              I agree but sadly there are a lot of companies out there that put profits ahead of their employees, and I worked at a number of places that made people work longer or extra just to make up the time they have missed due to an emergency or important appointment. In this day and age I don't understand why some bosses don't understand that if they treat their employees with respect and understanding, then in return they will then get that back, and if the company is ever in trouble, they will go above and beyond because they have done the same for them in the past.
                              You're right. Someone once said that respect is earned and not demanded. If you treat people with respect whatever their stature in life is, you will gain respect from them in return. Just 2 months ago, one of our employees suffered a loss in his family. Aside from allowing him to take time to grieve and fix the things that needed to be taken cared of regarding his grandmother's death, my husband assured him to just approach us if he ever needed any help or support with his grandmother's wake and funeral. We never expected it but after the funeral, his family has been showing us so much gratitude which also in return touched us in a big way. These kinds of situations also help employers and employees gain a deeper relationship with each other.

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                              • #30
                                Re: Dealing With Frequent Absences

                                Originally posted by Dropshipping View Post
                                I personally have a policy where if they do not take any leave in the entire month other Sundays, then I would pay them 1 day extra salary in addition to the normal salary. So, if they are taking a holiday the 1 day extra salary goes and since I do not provide any paid leaves, another day goes on which they have taken a leave.
                                Well this makes me wonder where these ideas were in my last couple of jobs. I am the type of person who never takes time off, I just don't do it, and when I see others constantly being off and getting away with it, it frustrates me. If I knew that I was being rewarded at the end, though, I think I would not really have an issue with them, and I would just say....you're loss. I guess t depends on the people and the business though, but your approach is interesting, so thank for sharing.

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